Danish Parliament Ratifies Faroe Islands’ Same-sex Marriage Law

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Danish Parliament held its final reading today on same-sex marriage legislation from the Faroe Islands.

The final vote in Copenhagen comes a year after Faroese Parliament voted to extend the right to marry to all couples and then passed the baton to Denmark. Provisions of the Faroese bill also allow full adoption rights for same-sex couples.

On a vote of 108-0, Denmark gave their ceremonial blessing to incorporating their own equal marriage laws into the islands. As a reading in Danish Parliament requires only 91 MPs to reach a quorum, the remaining MPs in the 179-seat Parliament were not present since it was not required due to the Danes respecting Faroese opinion on most civil matters.

Although it is simply a formality, Danish ratification on the matter was necessary to repeal a section of Denmark’s 2012 marriage legislation that barred their constituent territories of Greenland and the Faroe Islands from having to perform same-sex weddings. In its place will be a gender-neutral definition of marriage without territorial conditions that will be adopted into Faroese law as it was in Greenland in 2016.

According to the Danish Parliamentary website, Denmark will now allow the Faroese to marry after a two-step process following this week’s vote.

Today’s bill focuses on the international recognition of same-sex marriages and will enter into force following Royal Assent and a date chosen by the Justice Minister. For all remaining matters regarding marriage, a Royal Decree will be issued in the near future.

For more information on the LGBT rights situation in the Faroe Islands, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_the_Faroe_Islands

Mexico: Citing Civil Registry Mix Up, Chihuahua’s Governor Announces That Same-sex Couples Can Cannot Be Denied a Marriage License

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Days after it was reported that authorities in Chihuahua told same-sex couples that court injunctions would once again be required to marry inside the state, the Governor issued a statement declaring that under no circumstances can these couples be denied a marriage license.

The Governor told the media that the right to marry is a settled matter before the Supreme Court and claims to have personally stepped in to stop the confusion at the Civil Registry. The head of state denied reports that his predecessor’s 2015 executive order allowing Chihuahua to issue marriage licenses freely had been overturned.

Following the continuation of same-sex weddings in the area, Chihuahua once again joins Mexico City and the states of Campeche, Coahuila, Colima, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, and Quintana Roo in allowing same-sex couples to marry without court action.

Although deemed unconstitutional by rights groups quoting a past Supreme Court ruling because it does not also include the right to marry, the state of Tlaxcala allows civil unions for same-sex couples.

All remaining Mexican states require a lawsuit to wed and every state in Mexico must recognize same-sex marriages conducted in the country.

For more information on Mexico’s road to same-sex marriage, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_Mexico

Falkland Islands Says Yes to Same-sex Marriage

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Last March, on a vote of 7-1, the Falkland Islands’ Legislative Assembly approved gender-neutral marriage and civil partnership legislation which made the islands the latest addition in a growing list of British Overseas Territories to extend these rights to all couples.

The bill guarantees couples in civil partnerships the same parental rights as married couples and notes that “parents to a child may be two mothers or two fathers”.

Falkland couples will be able to enter a civil partnership or marry once the bill receives Royal Assent and a date of enactment is chosen by the Governor.

For more information on the LGBT rights situation on the Falkland Islands, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_the_Falkland_Islands.

Mexico: Chihuahua Halts Same-sex Marriages

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This week, Chihuahua’s Civil Registry halted the free celebration of same-sex marriages in the nation’s largest state.

The news came as several couples were told by the Registry that court injunctions will once again be required in order to marry within the state. This move ends the executive order issued in 2015 by the previous Governor allowing same-sex weddings freely.

LGBT activists blasted the reversal of the 2015 order and accused Chihuahua’s new Governor and his administration of bowing to pressure from conservative “For the Family” groups.

Activists will attempt to speak with the head of the Civil Registry and the Governor in hopes of resolving the matter promptly.

Previously, Chihuahua joined Mexico City and the states of Campeche, Coahuila, Colima, Guerrero (most municipalities), Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, and Quintana Roo in marrying couples without a court order. The state of Tlaxcala approved civil unions for same-sex couples despite a past Supreme Court ruling that separate is not equal.

Although the remaining Mexican states must recognize all marriages conducted in the country, court injunctions to wed in those remaining states themselves are expensive and time-consuming.

For more information on Mexico’s same-sex marriage journey, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Same-sex_marriage_in_Mexico

Danish Parliament Begins Process of Ratifying Faroes Islands’ Same-sex Marriage Law

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Almost a year after the Faroese Parliament approved a same-sex marriage and adoption bill, Danish Parliament held its first reading February 28th on legislation that would allow the Faroese law to come into effect.

Ratification from Denmark on the Faroese marriage legislation is seen as only a formality, but is required as the 2012 equal marriage law in Denmark, which is the basis for the Faroese same-sex marriage bill, states that none of the Danish constituent territories would be affected by the 2012 law.

The ratification process essentially repeals the clause making the Faroe Islands an exception to adopting Denmark’s same-sex marriage legislation and replaces local laws with gender-neutral wording which affords all couples the right to marry. Provisions within the marriage bill also allow for full adoption rights in the Faroes.

Danish Parliament will approach the ratification process in several steps. One step is to allow same-sex marriages to be held on the Faroe Islands through a Royal Decree and the other is to update the Faroese Procedural Code to mirror Denmark’s and allow for divorce for same-sex couples; the latter being the bill first mentioned in this article which requires two more readings from the Danes and Royal Assent.

Same-sex weddings on the islands should occur not long after the ratification process is completed in the future.

Guernsey Passes Final Same-sex Marriage Legislation; Weddings in 2017

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The States of Guernsey approved a same-sex marriage bill today by a vote of 33-5.

This vote comes almost a year after Guernsey voted in principle to modify their marriage laws to include same-sex couples.

The bill will now be sent to the Privy Council for its promulgation and weddings are expected to begin in mid-2017.

Guernsey is the second of the three British Crown Dependencies to open the door to same-sex weddings after Isle of Man began marrying couples in July. Jersey, who also voted in principle last year to expand marriage rights like Guernsey, stated that they will vote on their own final legislation in the coming months and also wish to hold weddings in 2017.

For more information on the LGBT rights situation in Guernsey, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_Guernsey

Aruba Approves Civil Unions

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After several postponements and heated debates, Aruba’s Parliament passed a civil union bill by a vote of 11-5 tonight.

The gender-neutral bill was brought forward by a local MP who married her female partner in the Netherlands and wished to address the issue of legal protection for non-married couples and same-sex couples already married within the Dutch Kingdom.

Despite all marriages performed within other regions of the Kingdom of the Netherlands being recognized on the island, same-sex couples cannot have their marriages performed in Aruba itself. Legal deficiencies are also present for couples of the same-sex as Aruba is not obligated to grant all the same rights to those marriages as it would with heterosexual couples.

The bill sought to bring in equal marriage in all but name. Supporters of the bill hope to see Parliament pass a same-sex marriage bill in the near future.

For more information on the LGBT rights situation in Aruba, please visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_rights_in_Aruba